Graphic Ladies!?

Graphic Ladies features the work of ladies who create and critique comics. We also tweet!

Reblog and share these posts to help raise the visibility of women in the comics industry.

Graphic Ladies is maintained by Erin Polgreen. Submit links and ideas here, or email graphicladies@gmail.com.

Special thanks to our sister site, Lady Journos, for helping make this happen.

tumblinks

search

powered by tumblr
seattle theme by parker ehret

  1. "Is Jack Kirby better than The Cremaster Cycle? Can’t we just have a world FULL of things that are in some way amazing, beautiful, touching and mind boggling, and not just five or six Sistine Chapels?"
     
     
  2. symboliamag:

Are you a journalist who wants to write about comics? Check out this loving, handy primer from the inestimable Dylan Meconis. 
“Some of these critics are just jerks who resent that their editor has torn the galley copy of the latest Houellebecq novel out of their hands and replaced it with some stupid book with pictures in it. Pictures. Only Umberto Eco gets to use pictures!
“I can’t help those people. I just feel bad for them, because they’re going to miss out on a lot of wonderful and important books.” —How Not To Write Comics Criticism by Dylan Meconis.

    symboliamag:

    Are you a journalist who wants to write about comics? Check out this loving, handy primer from the inestimable Dylan Meconis

    “Some of these critics are just jerks who resent that their editor has torn the galley copy of the latest Houellebecq novel out of their hands and replaced it with some stupid book with pictures in it. Pictures. Only Umberto Eco gets to use pictures!

    “I can’t help those people. I just feel bad for them, because they’re going to miss out on a lot of wonderful and important books.” —How Not To Write Comics Criticism by Dylan Meconis.

     
     
  3. "Still, that’s not to say that texts always operate in exactly the same way if we read them as fact or as fiction. This idea didn’t crystallize for me until the cartoonist Seth told me about a compliment he received from Art Spiegelman, who said he preferred It’s A Good Life If You Don’t Weaken as a work of fiction. Intrigued, I asked Spiegelman to explain exactly what happened when he changed the lens. “My first impression of the book was that it was a well-crafted, but excruciatingly slow and ‘low-stakes’ report on the artist’s not-all-that-exciting obsessional collecting,” he said. “Learning it was all invented and not relatively straightforward ‘first-degree’ reporting made me slow down and pay more attention to the details of what Seth was showing on the slow ride, and even let it all read as parody of other low-stakes autobio work.” Whatever the stakes, it’s important to remember that no story—even (and especially) in journalism—is without its fictions."
     
     
  4. Beginning at about age five, Flannery O’Connor drew and made cartoons, created small books, and wrote stories and comical sketches, often accompanied by her own illustrations. When she graduated from the Georgia State College for Women in Milledgeville in 1945, she was a celebrated local cartoonist preparing for a career in journalism that would, she hoped, combine work as a professional writer and cartoonist. Kelly Gerald on Flannery O’Connor’s past as a cartoonist for the Paris Review.

    Beginning at about age five, Flannery O’Connor drew and made cartoons, created small books, and wrote stories and comical sketches, often accompanied by her own illustrations. When she graduated from the Georgia State College for Women in Milledgeville in 1945, she was a celebrated local cartoonist preparing for a career in journalism that would, she hoped, combine work as a professional writer and cartoonist. Kelly Gerald on Flannery O’Connor’s past as a cartoonist for the Paris Review.

     
     
  5. "The “bubble” language spoken by Bechdel’s characters is the vulgate of modern America, and she illustrates her life’s most private moments with what feels, at times, like the gleeful exhibitionism of a streaker. But Bechdel’s narration has a quality that one of Flaubert’s biographers, writing of his letters, describes as “lucid comic anguish.”"
    — Judith Thurman profiles Alison Bechdel for The New Yorker
     
     
  6. "It’s funny—Thompson was worried, with the film version of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, that he’d be made into a cartoon, that his vision would be dulled by cartoons. … Here, rendered as a comic, he’s less of a cartoon than he was in his own prose before his death, at his own hand."
    — Sarah Jaffe reviews Gonzo: A Graphic Biography of Hunter S. Thompson for Cartoon Movement.
     
     
  7. "It is often said offhandedly that there is “manga for everyone,” but until recently, that was largely not true in English. There was manga for everyone if by “everyone” you meant everyone 12-18 years old or so. Now that the manga bubble has burst, manga publishers, searching for an audience that actually has money to spend on books – and prefers books to downloads – have stumbled on the niche adult manga market. Which means we’re actually getting manga these days more suited to adult tastes. Today we’re talking four food and drink manga that can help train your mind and palate and give you an instant one-upsmanship with your non-manga-reading foodie friends. Welcome to Pretentious Gittery in Food and Drink the Manga Way."
    — Eat, Drink, Read Manga by Erica Friedman.
     
     
  8. "A month ago, opening Habibi on the long bus ride back from SPX, I was more than baffled. It was, after all, an Orientalist book. But Habibi—even for a decades-spanning romantic epic—followed a shocking amount of familiar tropes from American melodrama."
    — Supermelodrama by Kailyn Kent.
     
     
  9. "Most of all, what I keep coming back to is that superhero comics are nothing if not aspirational. They are full of heroes that inspire us to be better, to think more things are possible, to imagine a world where we can become something amazing. But this is what comics like this tell me about myself, as a lady: They tell me that I can be beautiful and powerful, but only if I wear as few clothes as possible. They tell me that I can have exciting adventures, as long as I have enormous breasts that I constantly contort to display to the people around me. They tell me I can be sexually adventurous and pursue my physical desires, as long as I do it in ways that feel inauthentic and contrived to appeal to men and kind of creep me out. When I look at these images, that is what I hear, and I don’t think I even realized how much until this week."
     
     
  10. "A blues comic, like any blues narrative, is most compelling when it illuminates the suffering, heartache, and wry absurdity that gives the music its meaning, and exploits the dialogic relationship between the singer and the audience, rather than attempting to replicate chord progressions and flattened notes. To be sure, blues figures run the risk of being caricatured and over-romanticized; their lyrics are often used to invoke African American culture without any meaningful engagement."
    — Blues Comics by Qiana Whitted